Noodles, etc.

User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 5498
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Postby Slava » Sat Apr 03, 2010 11:08 pm

saparris wrote:
Swallowed like a postman’s sock


After a lot of walking, the postman's socks would be "swallowed" by his shoes (i.e., the socks would slide down into the shoes because of friction and gravity).

Basketball players have the same problem.
"I see," said the blind carpenter as he picked up his hammer and saw.

Thanks for the explanation. I guess they should wear OTCs, eh?

User avatar
saparris
Senior Lexiterian
Posts: 794
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: South Carolina USA

Postby saparris » Sat Apr 03, 2010 11:15 pm

My postman probably has trouble keeping his underwear from being swallowed by his pants, since he drives a truck all day. No walking in our neck of the woods.

(and why do woods have necks?)
Ars longa, vita brevis

User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 5498
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Postby Slava » Sun Apr 04, 2010 10:30 am

saparris wrote:(and why do woods have necks?)

Good question. When you find out, be sure to let us know, okay?

User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 4035
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Postby LukeJavan8 » Sun Apr 04, 2010 11:04 am

Basketball players have the same problem


......as do speedy walkers.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----

User avatar
saparris
Senior Lexiterian
Posts: 794
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: South Carolina USA

Postby saparris » Sun Apr 04, 2010 11:52 am

from etymology.com

Neck:
"O.E. hnecca "neck, back of the neck" (a fairly rare word) from P.Gmc...."

"...neck of the woods (Amer.Eng.) is attested from 1780 in the sense of "narrow stretch of woods."

Since the anatomical neck came first, narrow stretches of woods apparently looked like necks to someone looking down on a section of trees.
Ars longa, vita brevis

User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 4035
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Postby LukeJavan8 » Sun Apr 04, 2010 11:58 am

an unbelievably over-used term by meterologists
in our neck of the woods. Almost on a daily basis.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----

User avatar
saparris
Senior Lexiterian
Posts: 794
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: South Carolina USA

Postby saparris » Sun Apr 04, 2010 12:22 pm

an unbelievably over-used term by meteorologists in our neck of the woods. Almost on a daily basis.


I've never heard our meteorologists use the it. Apparently, they don't want to sound local, so they use terms like area, region, and corridor.
Ars longa, vita brevis

User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 4035
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Postby LukeJavan8 » Sun Apr 04, 2010 12:47 pm

Interesting. I've heard it on all four major networks.
But I am glad to know where it came from, as I've
toyed with the idea of searching it out myself. But
too lazy.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----

User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 2577
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Postby Stargzer » Sun Aug 15, 2010 6:46 pm

I don't know where "kick the bucket" came from, but it has a part in the beginning of the movie, "It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World." When Jimmy Durante's character dies on the hillside, one of his legs straightens out and kicks a bucket down the hill.

As to the CSM writer's example of "go to bat," yes, it's true that everyone bats in baseball (except the pitcher in the American League who has a Designated Hitter, at least in AL parks). However, there is also a "pinch hitter" in baseball, where another player replaces the current batter. However, he also replaces the batter in the line-up, taking over his position in the field.

I did like the German idiom, "With these people, you have to begin with Adam and Eve."
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee


Return to “Idioms”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest