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Posted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 1:57 pm
by sluggo
saparris wrote:And pay-ee-per is what you write on with a pen, which, or course, rhymes with pin.


I wish I had a dime for every time my Mississippi mother explained to us urchins: "Pin! P-E-N!". She never did use the term "inkpen", which when I finally heard it in Tennessee struck me as woefully redundant :roll:

(/offtopic)

Posted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 2:52 pm
by beck123
It feels odd being "Junior" folk on this site. Heck, I'm about to run out of clever things to say.

Posted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 3:48 pm
by saparris
And so, how does one say the Pepper of Salt and......?


One doesn't.

Posted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 8:23 pm
by LukeJavan8
Yes, even this discussion of Pin/Pen seems somewhat
redundant, having been done before.

Posted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 9:35 pm
by saparris
She never did use the term "inkpen"


My mother eats "green salads," drinks "sweet milk," and has sandwiches on "loaf bread."

Posted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 9:41 pm
by saparris
It feels odd being "Junior" folk on this site. Heck, I'm about to run out of clever things to say.


Think of it as reincarnation, Junior (a second life, if you will).

Posted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 9:43 pm
by Slava
saparris wrote:My mother eats "green salads," drinks "sweet milk," and has sandwiches on "loaf bread."
I agree with your mother on the salad bit. Let's face it, if you can call slop made with mayonnaise, potatoes, and/or macaroni "salad," we need the green for clarity.

Who's going to be the one to post "salad" to the suggestion board?

As bread comes in so many forms, I get the idea of "loaf" bread, too.

I'm a bit at a loss over the "sweet" of the milk, though. I have vague, vapid, thoughts thunking away, but I can't quite get there.

Posted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 11:01 pm
by saparris
I understand the green, loaf, and sweet qualifiers, but go to any restaurant, order a salad, and see what they bring you. Bet it won't be macaroni.

And if my mother asks me to bring her some bread from the store (she's elderly and lives with my wife and me), she doesn't expect pitas.

I see your point, but I still think it's funny that she says those things.

FYI, sweet milk is a cousin of buttermilk, a staple in a Southern kitchen.

Oh, and she also calls the thigh of a chicken a short leg.

Posted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 9:20 am
by beck123
Salad is a modern manifestation of "salted." In modern Spanish, the word is "ensalada," which literally means "salted."

I imagine salt was the preferred salad dressing in the days when people spoke Latin.

Posted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 11:52 am
by saparris
Which brings a new meaning to the term "salad days": the time before the doctor made you cut out salt.

Posted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 1:24 pm
by LukeJavan8
Loaf bread: my grandmother used to say that, and I
never questioned why. But since she baked rolls
and crescents, she probably made the distinction in
her own mind.

Salad: tuna salad, ham salad, egg salad.
Salt: a staple in all ages: even used as currency upon a time.

Posted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 1:38 pm
by saparris
I'll have the chicken salad on...uh...loaf bread.

Hold the Mayo. I don't like clinics.

Posted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:03 pm
by LukeJavan8
Pickle on the side?
Your puns should be in a clinic.
They belong in the thread called "Saturday". (he,he!)
There you will meet your match.
I wonder if "loaf" bread meant before it came sliced.
When people baked their own in a loaf pan?

Posted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:11 pm
by beck123
My wife and I have always (jokingly) wanted to open a restaurant called "Eaty Gourmet's," and we decided that if we did, the lunch counter would be called the Mayo Clinic. Great minds think alike.

Posted: Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:17 pm
by beck123
LukeJavan8 wrote:Salt: a staple in all ages: even used as currency upon a time.


Yep. That's reflected in the expression, "worth one's salt." It's also where the word "salary" originated.

"Celery," on the other hand (which is terrific in salads, and is one of the few standard vegetables of the European diet that originated in Scandanavia,) has its roots elsewhere.