gruntled and whelmed

Miscellaneous Other Topics.
User avatar
bailey66
Junior Lexiterian
Posts: 97
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2014 3:57 pm

gruntled and whelmed

Postby bailey66 » Fri Nov 07, 2014 10:07 pm

Can you be underwhelmed or regruntled? And why do people try to "unthaw" a steak?
If raveling is to take apart isn't unravel really knitting? Sometimes English makes no sense.

Mark hoping-for-some-discussion Bailey
In repentance and rest is your salvation, in quietness and trust is your strength, Isa30:15

User avatar
bailey36
Junior Lexiterian
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:03 pm

Re: gruntled and whelmed

Postby bailey36 » Fri Nov 07, 2014 10:28 pm

ok to clarify, I'm Bailey 36 on my pc which I rarely use and Bailey66 on my Kindle. I thought I had to register when I couldn't login on my Kindle. sorry for the confusion.


m. i'm-so-corfusded Bailey
m. Bailey
"Call to me and I will answer you and tell you great and unsearchable things you do not know."

Perry Lassiter
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 3333
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:41 pm
Location: RUSTON, LA
Contact:

Re: gruntled and whelmed

Postby Perry Lassiter » Sat Nov 08, 2014 8:51 pm

I have frequently said I am underwhelmed at all sorts of things. I attribute its use to my reputedly dry sense of humor.
pl

User avatar
bailey66
Junior Lexiterian
Posts: 97
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2014 3:57 pm

Re: gruntled and whelmed

Postby bailey66 » Sat Nov 08, 2014 10:26 pm

Perry Lassiter wrote:I have frequently said I am underwhelmed at all sorts of things. I attribute its use to my reputedly dry sense of humor.



You and me both, Perry. Dry as dust. Most folks don't get it all.
In repentance and rest is your salvation, in quietness and trust is your strength, Isa30:15

Perry Lassiter
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 3333
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:41 pm
Location: RUSTON, LA
Contact:

Re: gruntled and whelmed

Postby Perry Lassiter » Sun Nov 09, 2014 3:58 pm

What troubles me, Bailey, is I can find no wet humor.

Also in line with this thread it today's other post on frain/refrain.
pl

User avatar
bailey66
Junior Lexiterian
Posts: 97
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2014 3:57 pm

Re: gruntled and whelmed

Postby bailey66 » Sun Nov 09, 2014 8:33 pm

Perry I fear wet humor is what my father favored what we called bathroom humor. Anything genital, anal, or elimination-based was automatically funny. He got a lot of mileage out of his mother's friend Gladys.

This leaves me somewhat gruntled and mayed (whatever that means)
In repentance and rest is your salvation, in quietness and trust is your strength, Isa30:15

User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 2578
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Re: gruntled and whelmed

Postby Stargzer » Fri Oct 09, 2015 5:57 pm

Hmm. I've heard "underwhelmed" and "underwhelming" before, in the sense of being not to impressed with a presentation, but I didn't know their coinage was so recent in the scheme of the language.

My late friend Larry Bowen often talked about using the term "fully gruntled" as the opposite of "disgruntled." It turns out that "grungle" has been around longer than I'd thought.

"Unthaw" surprises me with its age.

Online Etymology Dictionary wrote:overwhelm (v.)
early 14c., "to turn upside down, to overthrow," from over- + Middle English whelmen "to turn upside down" (see whelm). Meaning "to submerge completely" is mid-15c. Perhaps the connecting notion is a boat, etc., washed over, and overset, by a big wave. Figurative sense of "to bring to ruin" is attested from 1520s. Related: Overwhelmed; overwhelming; overwhelmingly.

underwhelm (v.)
1953 (implied in underwhelming), a facetious play on overwhelm, with under. Related: Underwhelmed; underwhelmingly.

gruntle (v.)
1938, in gruntled "pleased, satisfied," a back-formation from disgruntled. The original verb (early 15c.) meant "to utter a little or low grunt," hence "to murmur, complain" (1580s), but was rare or dialectal by 19c.

disgruntled (adj.)
past participle adjective from disgruntle.

disgruntle (v.)
1680s, from dis- "entirely, very" + obsolete gruntle "to grumble" (Middle English gruntelen, early 15c.), frequentative of grunt (v.).

grunt (v.)
Old English grunnettan "to grunt," frequentative of grunian "to grunt," probably imitative (compare Danish grynte, Old High German grunnizon, German grunzen "to grunt," French grogner, Latin grunnire "to grunt"). Related: Grunted; grunting. Grunter "a pig" is from 1640s.

grunt (n.)
1550s, from grunt (v.); as a type of fish, from 1713, so called from the noise they make when hauled from the water; meaning "infantry soldier" emerged in U.S. military slang during Vietnam War (first recorded in print 1969); used since 1900 of various low-level workers. Grunt work first recorded 1977.

unthaw (v.)
1590s, "to thaw," from un- (2) "opposite of" + thaw (v.). Related: Unthawed; unthawing. Unthawed also sometimes is used with a sense "frozen" (1610s.).
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee

bnjtokyo

Re: gruntled and whelmed

Postby bnjtokyo » Tue Oct 13, 2015 12:41 am

The N-gram viewer reports a brief period of popularity for "underwhelm" around 1910. Two examples: "The beer-soused British workman is a sort of social sediment. He is an underwhelm, a blood relative of England's vast pauper class. " (Proceeding of the Conference on International Relations Held at Cornell University, June 1915)
Among the tortured tenantry of Hell,
Of which thou art an underwhelm?
Go.
Then for response,
The frightful specter wound a hideous laughter out,
And answered thus inflamingly :
Dost thou not know, the humble plant
(The Science of Poetry and the Philosophy of Language, Hudson Maxim, 1910)
"whelm," according to the 1913 Webster's Unabridged, means "To cover with water or other fluid" and cites Shakespeare: "She is my prize, or ocean whelm them all!" (Merry Wives of Windsor)

"Overwhelm" and "whelm" seem to be synonyms, so would "underwhelm" mean "to partially cover" or "to remove water so as to uncover that which was previously whelmed"?

As a noun, "underwhelm" would seem to refer to that object which is covered with fluid, as in the first example above ("a sort of social sediment") since a "sediment" is substance found under a liquid at the bottom of a container.


Return to “Res Diversae”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests