win/winner

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Cacasenno
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win/winner

Postby Cacasenno » Tue Nov 04, 2008 6:51 am

For some imperscrutable reason, lately I have observed an abundance of Good Words associable with an electoral contest. :wink:

Moving with this trend, let me propose another little everyday word with a respectable history.

Win/winner


PRONUNCIATION: wn
VERB: Inflected forms: won ( wn), win·ning, wins
INTRANSITIVE VERB: 1. To achieve victory or finish first in a competition. 2. To achieve success in an effort or venture: struggled to overcome the handicap and finally won.
TRANSITIVE VERB: 1. To achieve victory or finish first in. 2. To receive as a prize or reward for performance. 3a. To achieve or attain by effort: win concessions in negotiations. b. To obtain or earn (a livelihood, for example). See synonyms at earn1. 4. To make (one's way) with effort. 5. To reach with difficulty: The ship won a safe port. 6. To take in battle; capture: won the heights after a fierce attack. 7. To succeed in gaining the favor or support of; prevail on: Her eloquence won over the audience. 8a. To gain the affection or loyalty of. b. To appeal successfully to (someone's sympathy, for example). c. To persuade (another) to marry one: He wooed and won her. 9a. To discover and open (a vein or deposit) in mining. b. To extract from a mine or from mined ore.
NOUN: 1a. A victory, especially in a competition. b. First place in a competition. 2. An amount won or earned.
PHRASAL VERBS: win out To succeed or prevail. win through To overcome difficulties and attain a desired goal or end.
IDIOM: win the day To be successful.
ETYMOLOGY: Middle English winnen, from Old English winnan, to fight, strive. See wen-1 in Appendix I.
OTHER FORMS: winless —ADJECTIVE
winna·ble —ADJECTIVE


Appendix I

Indo-European Roots

ENTRY: wen-1
DEFINITION: To desire, strive for.
Derivatives include win, wont, wish, venerate, venereal, venom, and venison.
1. Suffixed form *wen-w-. win, from Old English winnan, to win, from Germanic *winn(w)an, to seek to gain. 2. Suffixed zero-grade form *w-y-. wynn, winsome, from Old English wynn, wen, pleasure, joy, from Germanic *wunj. 3. Suffixed (stative) zero-grade form *w--, to be contented. won1, wont, from Old English wunian, to become accustomed to, dwell, from Germanic *wunn. 4. Suffixed (causative) o-grade form *won-eyo-. wean, from Old English wenian, to accustom, train, wean, from Germanic *wanjan. 5. ween, from Old English wnan, to expect, imagine, think, from Germanic denominative *wnjan, to hope, from *wniz, hope. 6. Suffixed zero-grade form *w-sko-. wish, from Old English wscan, to desire, wish, from Germanic *wunsk-. 7. Perhaps o-grade form *won-. a. Vanir, from Old Norse Vanir, the Vanir; b. vanadium, from Old Norse Vanads, name of the goddess Freya. Both a and b from Germanic *wana-. 8. Suffixed form *wen-es-. a. venerate, venereal, venery1, Venus, from Latin venus, love; b. suffixed form *wen-es-no-. venom, from Latin vennum, love potion, poison. 9. Possibly suffixed form *wen-eto-, “beloved.” Wend, from Old High German Winid, Wend, from Germanic *Weneda-, a Slavic people. 10. Suffixed form *wen-y-. venial, from Latin venia, favor, forgiveness. 11. Lengthened-grade form *wn--. venery2, venison, from Latin vnr, to hunt. 12. Suffixed basic form *wen-o-. wanderoo, from Sanskrit vanam, forest. 13. Possibly zero-grade suffixed form *w-ig-. banyan, from Sanskrit vaik, vija, merchant (? < “seeking to gain”). (Pokorny 1. en- 1146.)

© The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.

Bailey
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Postby Bailey » Tue Nov 04, 2008 2:38 pm

a good word, it also contains in it the opposite, if one is a winner, someone else loses, particularily in a contest.

B.

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Slava
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Postby Slava » Tue Nov 04, 2008 4:53 pm

Bailey wrote:a good word, it also contains in it the opposite, if one is a winner, someone else loses, particularily in a contest.

B.
That is true, unless we're talking the modern approach to negotiations or conflict resolution, better now called transformation.

We're looking for win/win situations nowadays.
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.

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Cacasenno
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Postby Cacasenno » Wed Nov 05, 2008 1:27 pm

Slava wrote:
We're looking for win/win situations nowadays.

As an intermediate step, occasionally we could even settle for a ween/ween* situation, as a step forward from present whine/whine situations.

*expect, intend, hope (Archaic)

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Stargzer
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Postby Stargzer » Thu Nov 06, 2008 3:57 pm

Bailey wrote:a good word, it also contains in it the opposite, if one is a winner, someone else loses, particularily in a contest.

B.
The opposite of some Winners is Whiners.
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
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Bailey
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Postby Bailey » Thu Dec 25, 2008 10:20 pm

Stargzer wrote:
Bailey wrote:a good word, it also contains in it the opposite, if one is a winner, someone else loses, particularily in a contest.

B.
The opposite of some Winners is Whiners.
Better than "oh good job"; For the most banal and universally acheived, minor acomplishments.

mark too-many-atta-persons-given-out Bailey

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Postby sluggo » Fri Dec 26, 2008 12:14 pm

Cacasenno wrote:
Slava wrote:
We're looking for win/win situations nowadays.

As an intermediate step, occasionally we could even settle for a ween/ween* situation, as a step forward from present whine/whine situations.

*expect, intend, hope (Archaic)
:D :D very nice.

*Archaic in everyday use though still known to Gilbert & Sullivan players:
Of legal knowledge I acquired such a grip
That they took me into the partnership.
And that junior partnership, I ween,
Was the only ship that I ever had seen.
When I Was a Lad (H.M.S. Pinafore, 1878)

- and yet overween is still around.
Stop! Murder us not, tonsured rumpots! Knife no one, fink!

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Postby Bailey » Sat Dec 27, 2008 2:06 am

sluggo wrote:
Cacasenno wrote:
Slava wrote:
- and yet overween is still around.
They that overween,
And at thy growing virtues fret their spleen.
- Milton.
I've usually heard it o'erween. Hubris; the Word of the century
B.

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skinem
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Postby skinem » Sat Dec 27, 2008 3:38 pm

Bailey wrote:a good word, it also contains in it the opposite, if one is a winner, someone else loses, particularily in a contest.

B.
...unless you're involved in an overly-PC children sports league in which score is not kept.
Mustn't scar the lil' darlin's now with such concepts as competition, success, and the fact that life is often not fair.


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