Stand corrected

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Audiendus
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Stand corrected

Postby Audiendus » Fri Mar 13, 2020 1:12 am

What is the correct grammatical analysis of "I stand corrected"? Is 'stand' here an intransitive verb with independent meaning, as in "I stand firm" or "I stood transfixed with fear"? Or is it merely a linking verb (copula), equivalent to "I am in a corrected state"?

The latter explanation would make 'stand' analogous to the Spanish verb estar, which means 'to be (in a state)', but is derived from the Latin verb stare (to stand).

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Dr. Goodword
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Re: Stand corrected

Postby Dr. Goodword » Mon Mar 16, 2020 7:52 pm

Off the top of my head, I think it is a copula that simply verbalizes the adjective. There are many of these in English. What is "wage" in "to wage war"? It simply verbalizes the noun, it means something like "to do what you do in war". Similarly, "stand corrected" means "do whatever you do when you are corrected."

I have a list of phrases like "wage war" but don't know where I put it. There are quite a number of them, though. Wait, I remember another: "to throw a party".
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Audiendus
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Re: Stand corrected

Postby Audiendus » Mon Mar 16, 2020 10:34 pm

'Stand' in 'stand corrected' may be a copula, but I am quite sure that 'wage' in 'wage war' and 'throw' in 'throw a party' are ordinary transitive verbs, meaning 'conduct' and 'arrange' respectively. 'War' and 'party' are direct objects, not subject complements like 'fool' in 'I feel a fool' or 'nice place' in 'it seems a nice place'.

"Do what you do in war"? I don't quite get that. :?

bnjtokyo
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Re: Stand corrected

Postby bnjtokyo » Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:16 pm

etymonline, the on-line Etymological dictionary, says the meaning of Old English "standan" includes, inter alia, "be, exist" and that the "[s]ense of 'to exist, be present' is attested from c. 1300."
https://www.etymonline.com/word/stand


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