Frigorific

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Dr. Goodword
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Frigorific

Postby Dr. Goodword » Mon Mar 23, 2020 8:48 pm

• frigorific •


Pronunciation: fri-gê-ri-fik • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Adjective

Meaning: Frigiferous, making cold, chilling, cooling, both literally and figuratively.

Notes: This word lies on the brink of extinction, but it should be a welcomed substitute for 'making cold' or 'chilling' to any astute conversationalist. We see the root, frig-, in the roots of many English words, like refrigerator, Frigidaire, and frigid, always pronounced [frij] before I and E, and [frig] before A and O.

In Play: This word may refer to physical chilling: "Molly has a frigorific cooler that not only maintains the coolness of its content, but actually cools it." It may also refer to figurative chilling: "Moral nature requires the frigorific experience of seasoned ageing." Keep in mind this word means "causing cold or chill", not just "cold or chill".

Word History: Today's Good Word was borrowed from French frigorifique, the remnants of Late Latin frigorificus "cooling", the adjective of frigus, frigor- "cold, cool", from verb frigere "be cold". This word was created by juxtaposing the root of frigus, frig-o- and fic, the combining form of facere "do, make". Frigus comes from Proto-Italic srigos- with rhotacism of the final S, inherited from PIE srig- "cold", source also of Greek rhigos "cold, frost".
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bnjtokyo
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Re: Frigorific

Postby bnjtokyo » Tue Mar 24, 2020 7:16 am

May I ask some questions? When did this [j] before high vowels, and [g] before low vowels alternation develop? Is it a feature of French? Other Romance languages? Do we know whether it was (is?) a feature of Latin? How about Greek? Dare I ask, starpie?

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Dr. Goodword
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Re: Frigorific

Postby Dr. Goodword » Tue Mar 24, 2020 9:34 am

Actually, it is a feature of all Indo-European languages that I am familiar with at some point in their history. It's called "palatalization" and it occurred in Proto-Slavic: before front vowels g > zh, k > ch, kh > sh, a process which is still occurring in Portuguese, I've heard. I'm not so sure about Germanic languages. I do know that PIE kirk- "circle" became church in Modern English, though Scots English retained the original, kirk, as did other Germanic languages: German Kirche, Dutch kerk. It must have happened between Old English (cyrce ) and Middle English (cherche.

Oh, [j] is just [dzh]. Some languages retained the [d], others lost it or never had it.
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damoge
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Re: Frigorific

Postby damoge » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:40 am

I have a friend from Brazil whose name is Adilson, pronounced
ad jil son. Is a good way for me to remember how to approach new words.
Everything works out, one way or another


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