Reticule

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Dr. Goodword
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Reticule

Postby Dr. Goodword » Wed Sep 26, 2018 10:18 pm

• reticule •


Pronunciation: red-ê-kyul • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Noun

Meaning: 1. Crosshairs, a grid of fine vertical and horizontal lines in an optical device or graphics editor for locating visual objects precisely. 2. A woman's fabric purse with drawstrings.
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Notes: This word has been spelled reticle so many times that all English dictionaries now accept this spelling as that of a synonym. But we have a third synonym: graticule. Today's word is the basis for the verb reticulate [re-ti-kyê-layt] "divide or mark in a way that resembles a net". We have several adjectives from today's noun: reticulate [re-ti-kyê-lêt], reticular, and reticulated.
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In Play: The most frequent usage of this word is in reference to the reticule in the telescopic lens of a rifle, used to focus it: "The reticule in my rifle sight is off by at least a foot, or I wouldn't have missed that deer we saw." However, it haunts the world of fashion in reference to a lady's purse: "Maude Lynn Dresser came to the party with a small embroidered reticule on which you could clearly see the outline of a pistol."

Word History: Today's word is réticule, the French hand-me-down of Latin reticulum "small net, a net bag", the diminutive of rete "net", a word of unknown origin. It is probably a word borrowed from a non-Indo-European language. It was used in Proto-Indo-European, for we find rėtis "sieve" in Lithuanian. No other evidence of it survived. Graticule is also a French word meaning "grid", borrowed from Italian graticola "griddle, gridiron", which Italian inherited from Latin craticula "small gridiron", a diminutive of cratis "wickerwork". Latin inherited this word from PIE kert- "to turn, intertwine". French also turned craticula into Old French greil, which became gril "grill" in Modern French, whence English borrowed it as grill.
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Perry Lassiter
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Re: Reticule

Postby Perry Lassiter » Mon Oct 08, 2018 3:00 pm

Could a football field, often called a gridiron, be called a giant reticule?

Actually, the only place I've seen the word is in novels, referring to women carrying reticules.
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George Kovac
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Re: Reticule

Postby George Kovac » Mon Oct 08, 2018 3:48 pm

Could a football field, often called a gridiron, be called a giant reticule?


I'm not sure about that, but the chain used to measure whether the football advanced enough to earn a first down could be called an object of reticule.
“The messy layers of human experience get pulled together, and sometimes ordered, by words.” Colum McCann “But Always Meeting Ourselves” New York Times, June 15, 2009

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Re: Reticule

Postby Dr. Goodword » Tue Oct 09, 2018 8:50 am

:D
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