Knave

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Dr. Goodword
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Knave

Postby Dr. Goodword » Wed Nov 06, 2019 10:02 pm

• knave •


Pronunciation: nayv • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Noun

Meaning: 1. A dishonest man, a cunning unscrupulous rogue. 2. In a deck of cards, the jack.

Notes: Here is a word that renews alphaDictionary's long war on profanity. We know we're just jousting with windmills, but the alternatives to vulgar words are themselves more interesting. The abstract noun for this word is knavery, which rhymes with bravery, but the similarity ends there. The adjective is knavish "like a knave". Back in the 17th century some wag tried knavigation, but it didn't leave port.

In Play: We find today's Good Word frequently in the company of fool: "Whoever put the frog in the water cooler is a fool and a knave." It does keep other company elsewhere: "US politics is sprinkled with knights and knaves in approximately equal number."

Word History: In Old English this word was cnafa "boy, male child; male servant" from Proto-Germanic knabon- "boy", source also of Modern German knabe "boy, lad" and Knappe "squire, shield-bearer", and Dutch knaap "a youth, servant". It is also a distant relation to Swedish dialectal knabbe and Old Norse knapi "servant boy". We find no trace of a similar word in other Indo-European languages, so it must have entered Proto-Germanic from a non-Indo-European source.
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damoge
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Re: Knave

Postby damoge » Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:30 pm

"US politics is sprinkled with knights and knaves in approximately equal number."


My! Doesn't that bring back fond memories of yesteryear.
Everything works out, one way or another

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LukeJavan8
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Re: Knave

Postby LukeJavan8 » Sat Nov 16, 2019 2:16 pm

:lol:
-----please, draw me a sheep-----

Philip Hudson
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Re: Knave

Postby Philip Hudson » Wed Nov 20, 2019 3:37 pm

The first song I learned in German was: Röslein auf der Heiden.
Old Dr Keinname, our German teacher, had a naughty mind and explained the song in detail. If you don't understand it, be glad.
For translation see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heidenr%C3%B6slein

Sah ein Knab' ein Röslein stehn,
Röslein auf der Heiden,
War so jung und morgenschön,
Lief er schnell es nah zu sehn,
Sah's mit vielen Freuden.
Röslein, Röslein, Röslein rot,
Röslein auf der Heiden.

Knabe sprach: "Ich breche dich,
Röslein auf der Heiden."
Röslein sprach: "Ich steche dich,
Dass du ewig denkst an mich,
Und ich will's nicht leiden."
Röslein, Röslein, Röslein rot,
Röslein auf der Heiden.

Und der wilde Knabe brach
's Röslein auf der Heiden;
Röslein wehrte sich und stach,
Half ihr[n 1] doch kein Weh und Ach,
Musste[n 2] es eben leiden.
Röslein, Röslein, Röslein rot,
Röslein auf der Heiden.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.

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Dr. Goodword
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Re: Knave

Postby Dr. Goodword » Wed Nov 20, 2019 8:05 pm

I bought a record of German folk songs when I was at UNC and this song was on it. I listened to it over and over--it was a beautiful song--but I never thought to read between the lines.
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damoge
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Re: Knave

Postby damoge » Thu Nov 21, 2019 1:44 pm

Dr. Noname? really?
Awww c'mon. Nickname or you forgot his name?
Everything works out, one way or another


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