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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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139 Results 1900-1910

  • bash
    ( n ) A drunken spree. He went out on a bash last night and is pretty sick today.
    1900s
  • bonehead
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That bonehead let the air out of his own tires!.
    1900s
  • bunk
    ( n ) Nonsense. He said he aced the chem exam. That's bunk!
    1900s
  • butterflies in the stomach
    ( n ) Fearfulness, stage fright. Every time I talk to her I have butterflies in my stomach.
    1900s
  • call on the carpet
    ( vp ) To scold, chastise. The third time Winfred was late for work the boss called him out on the carpet.
    1900s
  • can
    ( v ) To fire. She talked back to the boss and got canned.
    1900s
  • cold
    ( adv ) Completely, immediately. Marguerite stopped Paul cold with her question.
    1900s
  • pan
    ( v ) To criticize severely. Lucy Lastik's ice-skating routine was panned by the judges.
    1900s
  • do in
    ( v ) To kill or destroy. His business was doing well until the hurricane destroyed his store and did him in.
    1900s
  • doll up
    ( v ) Dress up, dress stylishly. So where are you going, all dolled up?
    1900s
  • double-cross
    ( v ) To betray. He promised to pay me for painting his room but double-crossed me and didn't.
    1900s
  • frog
    ( n ) Hoarseness. I can't make a toast tonight; I have a frog in my throat.
    1900s
  • goop
    ( n ) A stupid person. He is such a goop he eats his peas with his fingers.
    1900s
  • goopy
    ( adj ) Stupid or foolish. Don't be so goopy; go along with the others.
    1900s
  • grouser
    ( n ) A complainer, a whiner. Doolittle is a constant grouser that everybody hates.
    1900s
  • hanging
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. That is a hanging new sweater Brenda bought her sister.
    1900s
  • hep
    ( adj ) A part of the current musical culture. That cat is hep to all the dives with cool jazz.
    1900s
  • ice
    ( n ) Diamonds, jewelry. She came dripping with ice.
    1900s
  • in the bag
    ( pp ) Assured, guaranteed. Everything is in the bag. There is nothing to worry about.
    1900s
  • jitney
    ( n ) A nickel, a 5-cent piece. He didn't have a jitney on him at the time.
    1900s
  • just off the boat
    ( pp ) Naive. He acts like he is just off the boat.
    1900s
  • killer
    ( n ) Something or someone excellent, outstanding. That new book by her mother is a real killer.
    1900s
  • lay off
    ( v ) To quit. Hey, lay off bothering me!
    1900s
  • lick
    ( n ) A bit, the smallest amount. He doesn't have lick of sense.
    1900s
  • live-wire
    ( np ) An exciting person. Maisy is a live-wire everyone wants at his or her party.
    1900s
  • loaded
    ( adj ) Rich, wealthy. I hear Leroy's parents are loaded.
    1900s
  • machine
    ( n ) A car (hot-rodders). You should see that boss machine of his.
    1900s
  • nut
    ( n ) A crazy person. I think that he is a nut.
    1900s
  • rap
    ( n ) An accusation. Eustace has a rap sheet as long as your arm.
    1900s
  • rat
    ( n ) A contemptible person. The little rat won't do anything I tell him.
    1900s
  • rat
    ( n ) An informer, a tattle-tale. The little rat told the principal!
    1900s
  • ratty
    ( adj ) Unfair. He got a ratty assignment in Java.
    1900s
  • read the riot act
    ( vp ) To scold, chastise severely. When mom saw the condition of my room, she read me the riot act.
    1900s
  • scrap
    ( v ) Cancel. We had to scrap plans to go to the beach when we saw the weather report.
    1900s
  • screw
    ( v ) To harm greatly. He got screwed by a used-car dealer.
    1900s
  • side-kick
    ( n ) Someone who always accompanies someone else. You never see Pedro without his side-kick, Manuel.
    1900s
  • snarky
    ( adj ) Irritable, short-tempered. Don't be so snarky; I only asked a question.
    1900s
  • stand up
    ( v ) To not show up for a date. Hortense said that she would meet me for dinner but she stood me up.
    1900s
  • tail
    ( v ) To follow. Quentin tailed his sister to the boy's house.
    1900s
  • thick
    ( adj ) Close, tight. They are as thick as thieves.
    1900s
  • word
    ( n ) News, latest gossip. So, what's the word, man?
    1900s
  • yeah
    ( adv ) Yes, a positive answer. Yeah, I'm going to the football game.
    1900s
  • hillbilly
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person from the country. Willy Earl tells everyone he is in computing but he is just a hillbilly who works in the stockroom of a computer warehouse.
    1900s
  • lollapalooza
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Boy, that storm last night was a real lollapalooza, wasn't it?
    1900s
  • skidoo
    ( v ) To leave. Come on, kiddo, time for us to skidoo.
    1900s
  • skiddoo
    ( v ) To leave. Come on, kiddo, time for us to skiddoo.
    1900s
  • fall for
    ( v ) To be deceived, tricked. I told him that my dad was the President of the United States and he fell for it.
    1900s
  • mutt
    ( n ) A dog. Hey, Fritz, what is your mutt barking at now?
    1900s
  • plug for
    ( v ) To promote, advance. Maudie brought the boss presents every day when she was plugging for a promotion.
    1900s
  • hawkshaw
    ( n ) Detective. Mildred hired some two-bit hawkshaw to follow me around and make sure I'm not seeing someone else.
    1900s
  • louse
    ( n ) A mean, despicable person. I won't have anything to do with that louse Ivan Oder.
    1900s
  • humdinger
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. That new baseball bat of Glen Gary's is a humdinger!
    1900s
  • movie
    ( n ) A motion picture. I do enjoy a good movie after dinner.
    1900s
  • doodad
    ( n ) Decorative article. Maybelle's house is full of fancy doodads she brought back from her world travels.
    1900s
  • wisenheimer
    ( n ) Someone who thinks he or she is smarter than others. Buzz is a wisenheimer who thinks he knows everything.
    1900s
  • yegg
    ( n ) Safe-cracker, a crook. Marvin hired some yegg to do his dirty work for him.
    1900s
  • dragnet
    ( n ) A widespread seach. The police put out a dragnet for the guy who beat you up.
    1900s
  • hock
    ( v ) To pawn. Billy hocked his guitar to get his watch out of hock.
    1900s
  • batty
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. If you think I'm going to get me to date your sister, you're batty.
    1900s
  • stir-crazy
    ( adj ) Crazy for being cooped up. I'm getting stir-crazy lying in bed all day .
    1900s
  • kiddo
    ( int ) Extended form of "kid". Look, kiddo, I ain't doing anything illegal.
    1900s
  • bean
    ( n ) The head. The picher threw a bean ball and knocked the batter out.
    1900s
  • beat it
    ( v ) To leave. When the cops drove up, we had to beat it.
    1910s
  • bimbo
    ( n ) A tough guy. Max is just another bimbo who goes around trying to pick fights in bars.
    1910s
  • Boy!
    ( int ) An emphatic interjection. Boy, was he surprised when I showed him my new erector set!
    1910s
  • break
    ( n ) Opportunity. A lucky break helped him get the job.
    1910s
  • bug
    ( v ) To equip with a burglar alarm. The coppers caught him when he entered a bugged house.
    1910s
  • bull
    ( n ) Nonsense. Everything you've said is just a load of bull and you know it.
    1910s
  • cootie
    ( n ) A body louse. I wouldn't go out with him; they say he has cooties.
    1910s
  • creep
    ( n ) A sneak thief. He was making a marginal living as a creep until the cops caught him at his trade.
    1910s
  • cushy
    ( adj ) Easy, simple. He has a really cushy job with a septic tank cleaner.
    1910s
  • date
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. He is such a soppy date, he should do well in politics.
    1910s
  • ding-bat
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. Archie Bunker always called his wife a ding-bat.
    1910s
  • drag
    ( n ) A draw (on cigarette, cigar, pipe, etc.). Hey, man, give me a drag on that pipe so I can see if that tobacco is any good.
    1910s
  • duck soup
    ( np ) Something easy. All her courses are duck soup.
    1910s
  • earful
    ( n ) A lot of gossip. My grandmother gave me an earful about the neighborhood.
    1910s
  • eat one's heart out
    ( vp ) To gnaw at, disturb, vex. It is best to talk about your problems than let them eat your heart out.
    1910s
  • fed
    ( n ) FBI investigator. His dad made moonshine until the feds caught up with him.
    1910s
  • gander
    ( n ) A look. Take a gander at that beefcake over there.
    1910s
  • gas
    ( n ) A joke. They played some kind of gas on her and made her mad.
    1910s
  • get on your nerves
    ( n ) To annoy, bother. Go play in another room; you are getting on my nerves.
    1910s
  • goldbrick
    ( n ) Someone who does not do his or her share of the work. That goldbrick sits in his office all day and doesn't do a lick of work.
    1910s
  • goof
    ( n ) Someone stupid or foolish. I am really a goof at times.
    1910s
  • grift
    ( v ) To run a con. I don't have any cash so we'll have to grift tonight.
    1910s
  • grifter
    ( n ) A con artist. John is such a grifter he runs cons on his mother.
    1910s
  • heel
    ( n ) A loser, a jerk. What a heel! He left is wife and kids for the circus.
    1910s
  • hoosegow
    ( n ) Jail or prison. You had better be careful that you don't end up in the hoosegow.
    1910s
  • jake
    ( adj ) Alright, OK. Who made all that noise? Is everything jake out here?
    1910s
  • jazz
    ( adj ) To excite, enthuse. This is going to be a great reunion. I'm really jazzed about going.
    1910s
  • jinx
    ( n ) Something or someone that brings bad luck. For a long time sailors thought that a woman on board ship was a jinx.
    1910s
  • joint
    ( n ) A questionable establishment. He took her to a joint he wouldn't want his mother to even know about.
    1910s
  • keen
    ( adj ) Attractive or appealing. She was a keen girl, with nice gams and figure.
    1910s
  • lay off
    ( v ) To fire (temporarily). The company laid off 100 people this week.
    1910s
  • mush
    ( n ) Sentimentality. The movie was full of romantic mush.
    1910s
  • nickel-and-dime
    ( v ) To niggle away, eat a way bit by bit. These telephone bills are nickel-and-diming me something awful.
    1910s
  • noodle
    ( n ) The head. Ow! I just bumped my noodle on that pipe up there.
    1910s
  • Nuts!
    ( int ) An interjection of disappointment. Nuts! I dropped my glasses down the sewer drain.
    1910s
  • pokey
    ( n ) Jail or prison. When his brother got out of the pokey, he went right back to making book.
    1910s
  • punch-drunk
    ( adj ) Brain-damaged from boxing. He had to quit the ring when he became to punch-drunk to focus his eyes.
    1910s
  • Reach for the ceiling!
    ( phr ) Raise your hands. Drop that gun and reach for the ceiling!
    1910s
  • Reach for the roof!
    ( phr ) Raise your hands. Drop that gun and reach for the roof!
    1910s
  • boner
    ( n ) A mistake, an error I must have pulled a real boner on the test; I flunked it.
    1910s
  • rinky-dink
    ( adj ) Run-down, old, old fashioned. The circus was really rinky-dink.
    1910s
  • scratch
    ( n ) Money. I need a burger; does anyone have any scratch?
    1910s
  • short
    ( n ) A street car. He used to ride the shorts to work.
    1910s
  • snookums
    ( n ) Female term of endearment. Hello, snookums, how did your day go?
    1910s
  • steam up
    ( v ) To excite, agitate. They tried without success to steam up his courage.
    1910s
  • straight
    ( adj ) Without ice. He was surprised to see her drink her whiskey straight.
    1910s
  • vigorish
    ( n ) High interest on a loan. He got the money from a loan shark who charged him 10% a day in vigorish.
    1910s
  • welcher
    ( n ) Someone who doesn't pay what is owed. You loaned him $10? The welcher will never pay you back.
    1910s
  • whacked
    ( adj ) Tired, exhausted. I'm whacked; I can't go anywhere tonight.
    1910s
  • wino
    ( n ) A homeless alcoholic. He always gives change to the winos downtown.
    1910s
  • yessir
    ( adv ) Yes, a positive answer. Yessir, that lady is my wife.
    1910s
  • blues
    ( n ) Depression, melancholy. Her boyfriend left her singing the blues
    1910s
  • loony bin
    ( np ) Insane asylum. Loan you $5? You should be locked up in a loony bin!
    1910s
  • curtains
    ( n ) The end. If we don't win this game, it's curtains for the coach.
    1910s
  • spruce off
    ( v ) To avoid a duty by deception. Mike Hunt will tell you he is going to do something then spruce off just when you need it done.
    1910s
  • crackpot
    ( n ) A crazy person with unworkable ideas. Thor Pearson has some crackpot idea about making powdered water.
    1910s
  • fall for
    ( v ) Fall in love with. The moment Moine saw Phillippe she fell for him like a ton of bricks.
    1910s
  • posh
    ( adj ) Luxurious. Larry, Harry, Barry, and Mary stayed in the poshest hotel in Paris.
    1910s
  • on the make
    ( pp ) Flirting, making advances on people of the opposite sex. Clara Belle was down at the bar last night on the make.
    1910s
  • floozy
    ( n ) A woman of loose morals Juan Carlos came to the party with some floozy he picked up at a bar.
    1910s
  • floozie
    ( n ) A woman of loose morals Juan Carlos came to the party with some floozie he picked up at a bar.
    1910s
  • gussy
    ( v ) To dress up. Well, look at Maud Lynn Dresser! Isn't she all gussied up?
    1910s
  • crumb
    ( n ) A mean, despicable person. The dirty crumb walked out and stuck me with the tab.
    1910s
  • simp
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That simp doesn't know how to tie his shoes!
    1910s
  • beat
    ( v ) Stump, be incomprehensible. It beats me how Snerdley pays for the gas for that car of his.
    1910s
  • do-hickey
    ( n ) An object for which a name is unavailable. Gert, do you know what this do-hickey on my tricycle is for?
    1910s
  • doohickey
    ( n ) An object for which a name is unavailable. There is something wrong with some little doohickey on my car engine.
    1910s
  • dilly
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Lester Workwithe just bought a dilly of a car from
    1910s
  • pug-ugly
    ( adj ) Very ugly. Luella and her pug-ugly friend came to the party late.
    1910s
  • roscoe
    ( n ) A handgun. Gimme yer roscoe, Roscoe; I can't crack this walnut with my teeth."
    1910s
  • meathook
    ( n ) A hand. Get your meathooks off me!
    1910s
  • clam up
    ( v ) To refuse to speak When I asked Joe Bones where he got the money for the car, he clammed up.
    1910s
  • beezer
    ( n ) A nose. Stan took one on the beezer when he told his wife to get him a beer.
    1910s
  • cabin-fever
    ( n ) Irritability from being cooped up indoors. I'm getting cabin-fever; I'm going fishing.
    1910s
  • blotto
    ( adj ) Drunk. Smedley came home blotto so often, it was a month before he realized his wife had left him.
    1910s
  • buzz off
    ( v ) Leave, say good-bye. Why don't you just buzz off and stop bothering me?
    1910s
  • dingbat
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. Archie Bunker always called his wife a ding-bat.
    1910s

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