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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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320 Results 1910-1920

  • beat it
    ( v ) To leave. When the cops drove up, we had to beat it.
    1910s
  • bimbo
    ( n ) A tough guy. Max is just another bimbo who goes around trying to pick fights in bars.
    1910s
  • Boy!
    ( int ) An emphatic interjection. Boy, was he surprised when I showed him my new erector set!
    1910s
  • break
    ( n ) Opportunity. A lucky break helped him get the job.
    1910s
  • bug
    ( v ) To equip with a burglar alarm. The coppers caught him when he entered a bugged house.
    1910s
  • bull
    ( n ) Nonsense. Everything you've said is just a load of bull and you know it.
    1910s
  • cootie
    ( n ) A body louse. I wouldn't go out with him; they say he has cooties.
    1910s
  • creep
    ( n ) A sneak thief. He was making a marginal living as a creep until the cops caught him at his trade.
    1910s
  • cushy
    ( adj ) Easy, simple. He has a really cushy job with a septic tank cleaner.
    1910s
  • date
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. He is such a soppy date, he should do well in politics.
    1910s
  • ding-bat
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. Archie Bunker always called his wife a ding-bat.
    1910s
  • drag
    ( n ) A draw (on cigarette, cigar, pipe, etc.). Hey, man, give me a drag on that pipe so I can see if that tobacco is any good.
    1910s
  • duck soup
    ( np ) Something easy. All her courses are duck soup.
    1910s
  • earful
    ( n ) A lot of gossip. My grandmother gave me an earful about the neighborhood.
    1910s
  • eat one's heart out
    ( vp ) To gnaw at, disturb, vex. It is best to talk about your problems than let them eat your heart out.
    1910s
  • fed
    ( n ) FBI investigator. His dad made moonshine until the feds caught up with him.
    1910s
  • gander
    ( n ) A look. Take a gander at that beefcake over there.
    1910s
  • gas
    ( n ) A joke. They played some kind of gas on her and made her mad.
    1910s
  • get on your nerves
    ( n ) To annoy, bother. Go play in another room; you are getting on my nerves.
    1910s
  • goldbrick
    ( n ) Someone who does not do his or her share of the work. That goldbrick sits in his office all day and doesn't do a lick of work.
    1910s
  • goof
    ( n ) Someone stupid or foolish. I am really a goof at times.
    1910s
  • grift
    ( v ) To run a con. I don't have any cash so we'll have to grift tonight.
    1910s
  • grifter
    ( n ) A con artist. John is such a grifter he runs cons on his mother.
    1910s
  • heel
    ( n ) A loser, a jerk. What a heel! He left is wife and kids for the circus.
    1910s
  • hoosegow
    ( n ) Jail or prison. You had better be careful that you don't end up in the hoosegow.
    1910s
  • jake
    ( adj ) Alright, OK. Who made all that noise? Is everything jake out here?
    1910s
  • jazz
    ( adj ) To excite, enthuse. This is going to be a great reunion. I'm really jazzed about going.
    1910s
  • jinx
    ( n ) Something or someone that brings bad luck. For a long time sailors thought that a woman on board ship was a jinx.
    1910s
  • joint
    ( n ) A questionable establishment. He took her to a joint he wouldn't want his mother to even know about.
    1910s
  • keen
    ( adj ) Attractive or appealing. She was a keen girl, with nice gams and figure.
    1910s
  • lay off
    ( v ) To fire (temporarily). The company laid off 100 people this week.
    1910s
  • mush
    ( n ) Sentimentality. The movie was full of romantic mush.
    1910s
  • nickel-and-dime
    ( v ) To niggle away, eat a way bit by bit. These telephone bills are nickel-and-diming me something awful.
    1910s
  • noodle
    ( n ) The head. Ow! I just bumped my noodle on that pipe up there.
    1910s
  • Nuts!
    ( int ) An interjection of disappointment. Nuts! I dropped my glasses down the sewer drain.
    1910s
  • pokey
    ( n ) Jail or prison. When his brother got out of the pokey, he went right back to making book.
    1910s
  • punch-drunk
    ( adj ) Brain-damaged from boxing. He had to quit the ring when he became to punch-drunk to focus his eyes.
    1910s
  • Reach for the ceiling!
    ( phr ) Raise your hands. Drop that gun and reach for the ceiling!
    1910s
  • Reach for the roof!
    ( phr ) Raise your hands. Drop that gun and reach for the roof!
    1910s
  • boner
    ( n ) A mistake, an error I must have pulled a real boner on the test; I flunked it.
    1910s
  • rinky-dink
    ( adj ) Run-down, old, old fashioned. The circus was really rinky-dink.
    1910s
  • scratch
    ( n ) Money. I need a burger; does anyone have any scratch?
    1910s
  • short
    ( n ) A street car. He used to ride the shorts to work.
    1910s
  • snookums
    ( n ) Female term of endearment. Hello, snookums, how did your day go?
    1910s
  • steam up
    ( v ) To excite, agitate. They tried without success to steam up his courage.
    1910s
  • straight
    ( adj ) Without ice. He was surprised to see her drink her whiskey straight.
    1910s
  • vigorish
    ( n ) High interest on a loan. He got the money from a loan shark who charged him 10% a day in vigorish.
    1910s
  • welcher
    ( n ) Someone who doesn't pay what is owed. You loaned him $10? The welcher will never pay you back.
    1910s
  • whacked
    ( adj ) Tired, exhausted. I'm whacked; I can't go anywhere tonight.
    1910s
  • wino
    ( n ) A homeless alcoholic. He always gives change to the winos downtown.
    1910s
  • yessir
    ( adv ) Yes, a positive answer. Yessir, that lady is my wife.
    1910s
  • blues
    ( n ) Depression, melancholy. Her boyfriend left her singing the blues
    1910s
  • loony bin
    ( np ) Insane asylum. Loan you $5? You should be locked up in a loony bin!
    1910s
  • curtains
    ( n ) The end. If we don't win this game, it's curtains for the coach.
    1910s
  • spruce off
    ( v ) To avoid a duty by deception. Mike Hunt will tell you he is going to do something then spruce off just when you need it done.
    1910s
  • crackpot
    ( n ) A crazy person with unworkable ideas. Thor Pearson has some crackpot idea about making powdered water.
    1910s
  • fall for
    ( v ) Fall in love with. The moment Moine saw Phillippe she fell for him like a ton of bricks.
    1910s
  • posh
    ( adj ) Luxurious. Larry, Harry, Barry, and Mary stayed in the poshest hotel in Paris.
    1910s
  • on the make
    ( pp ) Flirting, making advances on people of the opposite sex. Clara Belle was down at the bar last night on the make.
    1910s
  • floozy
    ( n ) A woman of loose morals Juan Carlos came to the party with some floozy he picked up at a bar.
    1910s
  • floozie
    ( n ) A woman of loose morals Juan Carlos came to the party with some floozie he picked up at a bar.
    1910s
  • gussy
    ( v ) To dress up. Well, look at Maud Lynn Dresser! Isn't she all gussied up?
    1910s
  • crumb
    ( n ) A mean, despicable person. The dirty crumb walked out and stuck me with the tab.
    1910s
  • simp
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That simp doesn't know how to tie his shoes!
    1910s
  • beat
    ( v ) Stump, be incomprehensible. It beats me how Snerdley pays for the gas for that car of his.
    1910s
  • do-hickey
    ( n ) An object for which a name is unavailable. Gert, do you know what this do-hickey on my tricycle is for?
    1910s
  • doohickey
    ( n ) An object for which a name is unavailable. There is something wrong with some little doohickey on my car engine.
    1910s
  • dilly
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Lester Workwithe just bought a dilly of a car from
    1910s
  • pug-ugly
    ( adj ) Very ugly. Luella and her pug-ugly friend came to the party late.
    1910s
  • roscoe
    ( n ) A handgun. Gimme yer roscoe, Roscoe; I can't crack this walnut with my teeth."
    1910s
  • meathook
    ( n ) A hand. Get your meathooks off me!
    1910s
  • clam up
    ( v ) To refuse to speak When I asked Joe Bones where he got the money for the car, he clammed up.
    1910s
  • beezer
    ( n ) A nose. Stan took one on the beezer when he told his wife to get him a beer.
    1910s
  • cabin-fever
    ( n ) Irritability from being cooped up indoors. I'm getting cabin-fever; I'm going fishing.
    1910s
  • blotto
    ( adj ) Drunk. Smedley came home blotto so often, it was a month before he realized his wife had left him.
    1910s
  • buzz off
    ( v ) Leave, say good-bye. Why don't you just buzz off and stop bothering me?
    1910s
  • dingbat
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. Archie Bunker always called his wife a ding-bat.
    1910s
  • ace
    ( n ) One dollar bill. Let's eat out tonight; I have a couple of aces burning a hole in my pocket.
    1920s
  • all wet
    ( ap ) Wrong. You're all wet. The New York Giants didn't win the 1937 World Series.
    1920s
  • And how!
    ( int ) An interjection of strong agreement. Did I have a good time? And how!.
    1920s
  • Applesauce!
    ( int ) Nonsense! Applesauce! The New York Yankees won the 1937 World Series.
    1920s
  • attaboy
    ( int ) Well done! Attaboy, Greg. You show them!
    1920s
  • attagirl
    ( int ) Well done! Attagirl, Gwen. You show them!
    1920s
  • ax
    ( n ) Dismissal from work. The fourth time they caught her sleeping on the job, Constance Noring was given the ax.
    1920s
  • ax
    ( v ) To fire. He just got axed from his third job this week.
    1920s
  • baby
    ( n ) Sweetheart. She's my baby and I'd do anything for her.
    1920s
  • balled up
    ( adj ) Confused. Rodney's all balled up; he doesn't know if he is coming or going.
    1920s
  • baloney
    ( n ) Nonsense! That's a lot of baloney and you know it! None of it is true.
    1920s
  • bearcat
    ( n ) A sexy or seductive woman. Man, that Cindy Lou is a lot of fun! What a bearcat that woman is!
    1920s
  • beat one's gums
    ( vp ) To talk. We were just sitting around, beating our gums about nothing.
    1920s
  • beef
    ( n ) A complaint. Why are you complaining? What's your beef?
    1920s
  • beef
    ( v ) To complain. Stop beefing about the curfew; you can't do anything about it.
    1920s
  • bee's knees
    ( np ) Something excellent, outstanding. Mavis, that new perfume you got is the bee's knees!
    1920s
  • beeswax
    ( n ) Business. What's my name? None of your beeswax.
    1920s
  • bell-bottom
    ( n ) A sailor. She has dated every bell-bottom in San Diego.
    1920s
  • big cheese
    ( np ) An important person. He thinks that he is a big cheese just because he has a new Oldsmobile.
    1920s
  • big shot
    ( np ) An important person. He thinks that he is a big shot just because he drives around in a Caddie.
    1920s
  • big six
    ( np ) A strong man. He's a big six in my book any day.
    1920s
  • bird
    ( n ) An eccentric. You never know what that old bird is going to do next.
    1920s
  • blind date
    ( np ) A date you have never met before. The bonehead never went out on blind dates because he thought they were with girls who couldn't see.
    1920s
  • bluenose
    ( n ) A puritanical person, a prude. The party was filled with so many prudes and bluenoses nobody had any fun.
    1920s
  • boocoo
    ( adj ) Much, a lot. I don't have boocoo time to help you with that.
    1920s
  • boocoos
    ( n ) A large amount. I had boocoos of money before the market crashed.
    1920s
  • booger
    ( n ) A bit of dried nasal mucus. Hey, Jeremiah, you have a booger hanging from your nose.
    1920s
  • bootleg
    ( adj ) Illegal, smuggled. His dad made enough money running bootleg liquor to open a bank before Prohibition ended.
    1920s
  • bozo
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That bozo doesn't know ham from a hammer.
    1920s
  • breezer
    ( n ) A convertible car. Let's put the top down on the breezer and let the wind blow through our hair.
    1920s
  • Bronx cheer
    ( np ) Blowing air through the closed lips to make a disgusting sound. When he cut in front of the taxi, he received a Bronx cheer from the cabbie.
    1920s
  • Buddy Roe
    ( int ) A threatening form of address for a male in the South. Look out, Buddy Roe, or you'll get into trouble!
    1920s
  • bug
    ( n ) A burglar alarm system. He was caught when he broke into a house that was bugged.
    1920s
  • bull session
    ( np ) An informal conversation. The boys got together at Raphael's for an all-night bull-session.
    1920s
  • bump off
    ( v ) To kill. The boss thought we ought to bump off the informer.
    1920s
  • bum's rush
    ( np ) Ejection by force. Stanley became so obnoxious, we had to give him the bum's rush to get him out.
    1920s
  • canned
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. The woman is canned; have her husband take her home.
    1920s
  • caper
    ( n ) A crime. Sturgeon thought he was a master mind but the cops caught up with him after 4 or 5 capers.
    1920s
  • carry a torch
    ( vp ) To love someone. Maxwell's carrying a torch for Madeleine.
    1920s
  • cat's meow
    ( np ) Something excellent, outstanding. Wow, Kathleen! That new hat is the cat's meow.
    1920s
  • cat's pajamas
    ( np ) Something excellent, outstanding. I hear LaVern's new Duisenberg is the cat's pajamas.
    1920s
  • chassis
    ( n ) The female figure. She is a lovely lady with a classy chassis.
    1920s
  • cheaters
    ( n ) Eyeglasses. He can't see past the end of his nose without his cheaters.
    1920s
  • clam
    ( n ) A dollar. Hey, this suit cost me 20 clams!
    1920s
  • clip
    ( v ) To steal. He clips something every time he goes into a store.
    1920s
  • copacetic
    ( adj ) OK, alright. Everything between me and my baby is copacetic.
    1920s
  • corked
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Lorimar is too corked to go home alone.
    1920s
  • crackers
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. He offered me $250 for my Stutz-Bearcat. He must be crackers!
    1920s
  • crush
    ( n ) An infatuation. She has a crush on her teacher and spends all day studying biology.
    1920s
  • daddy
    ( n ) A rich male protector who usually expects favors from his female charge. Tillie has a (sugar) daddy who takes care of all her bills.
    1920s
  • dame
    ( n ) A female (offensive). She's a swell dame; I like her a lot.
    1920s
  • date
    ( n ) A person of the opposite sex you go out with. I have a hot date tonight, so I won't be able to go out with you guys.
    1920s
  • dead soldier
    ( n ) An empty beer bottle. They were in the living room surrounded by a case of dead soldiers.
    1920s
  • dick
    ( n ) A private investigator. Sally hired a private dick to tail her husband.
    1920s
  • dive
    ( n ) A cheap bar. I wouldn't drink any of the hooch they serve in that dive.
    1920s
  • dog
    ( n ) A foot. Boy, are my dogs tired!
    1920s
  • doll
    ( n ) An attractive female. Maria was quite a doll when she dressed up.
    1920s
  • Don't take any wooden nickels
    ( phr ) Don't do anything stupid. When you go to the big city, Luke, don't take any wooden nickels.
    1920s
  • doozy
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. He came home with a doozy of a knot on his head.
    1920s
  • dumb Dora
    ( np ) A stupid female. What a dumb Dora she is: when her husband asked if she like the new China, she replied, 'No, I hate the communists.'.
    1920s
  • dynamite
    ( n ) Heroine. He is a lovely man but they say he is addicted to dynamite.
    1920s
  • earful
    ( n ) A significant statement. When Russell came home plastered, his wife gave him an earful that he will never forget.
    1920s
  • edge
    ( n ) State of drunkenness, intoxication. Let's go; I'm getting an edge.
    1920s
  • egg
    ( n ) A person who lives well. Oh, you never want to miss Lucien's parties; he's a very good egg.
    1920s
  • embalmed
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Lance was so embalmed that he didn't come to as they rolled him down the hill to the car.
    1920s
  • fall guy
    ( np ) A scapegoat. They dumped all the evidence in Preston's locker, deciding to let him be the fall guy.
    1920s
  • fin
    ( n ) 5-dollar bill. Hey, Wayland, loan me a fin until payday.
    1920s
  • fire extinguisher
    ( np ) A chaperone. Priscilla was so hot, she could never go out without a fire extinguisher.
    1920s
  • fish
    ( n ) A college freshman. Hey, guys, the freshman looks like a fish out of water; let's make him water the shrubbery in the rain.
    1920s
  • fix
    ( n ) A bribe, bribery. The cops never pick up Joey because the fix is in.
    1920s
  • fix
    ( v ) To bribe. Barney fixed the judge in his case, so he got off Scot free.
    1920s
  • flapper
    ( n ) An exciting woman in short, stylish skirts and short hair. In her youth Purity was one of the best known flappers in town.
    1920s
  • flat
    ( adj ) Out of air. The cause of the jostling was a flat tire.
    1920s
  • flat tire
    ( np ) A stupid female. I took that flat tire out once--never again!
    1920s
  • flivver
    ( n ) A Model T Ford. Sure, he's hot: he took me out in his dad's flivver.
    1920s
  • fly boy
    ( np ) An aviator, someone in the Air Force. Prunella is going with some fly boy out at the base.
    1920s
  • frame
    ( n ) To give false evidence. My best friend tried to frame me for flushing the cherry bomb down the john by putting the rest of them in my locker.
    1920s
  • fried
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so fried we rolled him to the car and he never came to.
    1920s
  • gam
    ( n ) A woman's leg. She has a great figure and even greater gams.
    1920s
  • get a wiggle on
    ( vp ) Speed up. We're going to be late for the ballet--get a wiggle on!
    1920s
  • giggle-water
    ( np ) Liquor or other alcoholic beverage. He poured me a glass of some kind of giggle water and that's the last thing I remember.
    1920s
  • gigolo
    ( n ) A kept man who lives off women. His mother has a gigolo that she spends a lot of time with.
    1920s
  • gin mill
    ( np ) A bar. She dragged me down to some gin mill where her sister sang and hoofed.
    1920s
  • glad rags
    ( np ) Dressy clothes. Hey, Daisy, put on some glad rags and I'll take you to a ritzy night club.
    1920s
  • gold digger
    ( n ) A female after a man's money. She doesn't love him; she is just a gold-digger after his money.
    1920s
  • gold-digger
    ( n ) A woman trying to marry a wealthy man. Do you really love me or are you just another gold-digger after my money?
    1920s
  • goofy
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. He gone goofy over Alice.
    1920s
  • grand
    ( n ) A thousand dollars. His salary is twenty grand a month.
    1920s
  • guy
    ( n ) A fellow. That guy's been in a lot of trouble, (bloke).
    1920s
  • handcuff
    ( n ) An engagement ring. I love the woman but she'll never get the handcuff on me.
    1920s
  • hard-boiled
    ( adj ) Tough and cold. Harry's a hard-boiled cop who doesn't take anything from anybody.
    1920s
  • hayburner
    ( n ) A gas-guzzling car. He has a cool set of wheels but his dad drives a hayburner.
    1920s
  • hayburner
    ( n ) A horse that never wins a race. Don't talk to me; I just lost a week's salary on a hayburner at the track.
    1920s
  • heat
    ( n ) A gun. Watch out for John, he's strapped with heat.
    1920s
  • heater
    ( n ) A gun. The mobster had a lump in his coat that suggested a heater.
    1920s
  • heebie-jeebies
    ( n ) Nervousness. Just thinking about the dentist gives me the heebie-jeebies.
    1920s
  • heist
    ( n ) An armed robbery. There was a heist at the bank today.
    1920s
  • hick
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person from the country. Patsy is dating some hick who wears a straw hat.
    1920s
  • high-hat
    ( v ) To snub someone. When I asked her out, she high-hatted me and walked away.
    1920s
  • hit on all sixes
    ( vp ) To perform perfectly. We lost last night because our star player was not hitting on all sixes.
    1920s
  • hit the road
    ( vp ) To leave. Man, it's 11 o'clock; time for us to hit the road.
    1920s
  • hood
    ( n ) A hoodlum, gangster. It is a nice neighborhood except for a couple of hoods who live down the block.
    1920s
  • hoofer
    ( n ) A dancer. He's dating some hoofer at Radio City Hall.
    1920s
  • hook
    ( v ) To addict. They say Zelda is hooked on heroine.
    1920s
  • Hoopty-doo!
    ( int ) An interjection of celebration. Hoopty-doo! Fred got a promotion and a big raise!
    1920s
  • horse
    ( v ) To play with carelessly. I don't have time to horse around; let's get down to business.
    1920s
  • horse feathers
    ( int ) Nonsense. Horse feathers! You never dated Clara Bow!
    1920s
  • hot
    ( adj ) Fast (music). I like my jazz hot, not cool.
    1920s
  • hot
    ( adj ) Electrically charged or radioactive. He accidentally picked up a hot wire and got a shock.
    1920s
  • hot seat
    ( np ) The electric chair. Marcus got the hot seat for murder.
    1920s
  • hotsy-totsy
    ( adj ) Seemingly excellent, outstanding. He thinks that just because he drives some hotsy-totsy Stutz Bearcar, he's the cat's meow.
    1920s
  • hype
    ( n ) Hypodermic needle. If you aren't on drugs, why are all these hypes in your room?
    1920s
  • hype
    ( v ) To swindle by overcharging or short-changing. I think they hyped me back there at the store.
    1920s
  • it
    ( n ) Sex appeal. Whatever it is, she has it.
    1920s
  • jack
    ( n ) Money. He's a nice-looking guy but he doesn't have enough jack for me.
    1920s
  • jalopy
    ( n ) An old, beat-up car. Where did you get that old jalopy?
    1920s
  • jane
    ( n ) Any female. He picked up some jane at the bar last night.
    1920s
  • java
    ( n ) Coffee. Give me a cup of java and one of your week-old doughnuts.
    1920s
  • jazz
    ( v ) To enhance, make more decorative. He
    1920s
  • jazzed
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. Get him out of here; he's totally jazzed.
    1920s
  • jive
    ( n ) Fast jazz of the 20s-30s. I know a little club where they play jive until 2 in the morning.
    1920s
  • jive
    ( v ) To mislead, deceive. Don't try to jive me, man. I know what's what.
    1920s
  • jive
    ( v ) To play fast jazz of the 20s-30s. He had a group that would jive all night.
    1920s
  • jive
    ( n ) Worthless, crazy, or unpleasant talk. Don't talk that jive to me, turkey; I don't believe a word you say.
    1920s
  • joe
    ( n ) Coffee. Give me a cup of joe, Joe, and a piece of Mabel's crabapple pie or whatever it is.
    1920s
  • john
    ( n ) A toilet or the toilet. When he flushed the john, he was surprised to see his cap disappearing down the hole.
    1920s
  • juice joint
    ( n ) A speakeasy. For five years Myrtle ran a juice-joint until they caught her for selling bootleg hootch.
    1920s
  • killjoy
    ( n ) A squelcher. My parents are killjoys who don't want me to wear so many beads.
    1920s
  • kisser
    ( n ) Mouth. Watch what you say, Bub, or I'll pop you one in the kisser.
    1920s
  • kosher
    ( adj ) Fair. Well, the deal to trade your car for his motorcycle doesn't sound kosher to me.
    1920s
  • level
    ( n ) Honest, truthful. Level with me: did you really take Jeanette MacDonald out?
    1920s
  • line
    ( n ) Flirtatious talk designed to pick up a date. He fed me this line about how many banks he owned which didn't work when I saw the jalopy he was driving.
    1920s
  • lit
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He came home lit and fell into bed like a rock.
    1920s
  • make whoopee
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. They were making whoopee in his Model-T Ford.
    1920s
  • Mrs. Grundy
    ( np ) A priggish or prudish person. She is such a Mrs. Grundy that she refuses to go into the water.
    1920s
  • night owl
    ( np ) A person who stays out late. Bertram is a night owl who seldom gets up before noon.
    1920s
  • Now you're on the trolley!
    ( phr ) Now you have caught on. Yeah, Yeah! Monday comes BEFORE Tuesday. Now you're on the trolley!
    1920s
  • nudnik
    ( n ) An irritating person. Get that nudnik out of here; I can't stand her.
    1920s
  • off the deep end
    ( pp ) To lose control of yourself, go crazy. Billy Ray went off the deep end when his wife left him.
    1920s
  • oil can
    ( n ) A stupid female. I took that oil can out once--never again!
    1920s
  • old man
    ( n ) Father. His old man won't let him drive the car.
    1920s
  • on the lam
    ( pp ) Fleeing from the law. Morgan was on the lam for five years, then spent five more in the joint.
    1920s
  • on the level
    ( pp ) Honest, truthful. On the level, now, did you take Mary Pickford out to supper?
    1920s
  • on the make
    ( pp ) Flirting, looking for someone to seduce. The way she is talking to all the men looks like she is on the make.
    1920s
  • on the up and up
    ( pp ) Honest, truthful. I think he is on the up and up when he says he owns 27 banks.
    1920s
  • ossified
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so ossified we had to drag him to the car.
    1920s
  • over the edge
    ( pp ) Crazy, insane. I think another bit of bad news would push Billy Ray over the edge.
    1920s
  • owled
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so owled we had to drag him to the car.
    1920s
  • palooka
    ( n ) A strong male. I'm just waiting for the right palooka to come along and sweep me off my feet.
    1920s
  • pet
    ( v ) To hug and kiss. They must be in love; I saw them petting at the drive-in last night.
    1920s
  • pig
    ( n ) Glutton. He is a pig at parties.
    1920s
  • piker
    ( n ) A cheapskate. The piker always makes me pay for the gas.
    1920s
  • pill
    ( n ) An unlikable person. She is a bitter pill to take with her uppity attitude and all.
    1920s
  • pinch
    ( v ) To capture or arrest. I heard Sedgewick got pinched for shoplifting.
    1920s
  • pip
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. Gwendolyn always pays the bill; she's a pip.
    1920s
  • pipe down
    ( v ) Be quiet. Pipe down! I want to hear what the president is saying.
    1920s
  • plastered
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so plastered we had to roll him down the embankment to the car.
    1920s
  • pop
    ( v ) To hit. Shut up or I will pop you.
    1920s
  • potted
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so potted we had to drag him to the car.
    1920s
  • primed
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. He was so primed we had to pull him to the car in my kid brother's wagon.
    1920s
  • pull rank
    ( vp ) To force someone to do something because you have the authority to do so. I didn't want to go but the boss pulled rank on me and made me.
    1920s
  • punk
    ( n ) A young hooligan. All the punks in the neighborhood hang out at the pool hall.
    1920s
  • punk out
    ( v ) To back out from cowardice. We were going over Niagara Falls in a barrel but Jason punked out.
    1920s
  • pushover
    ( n ) A person easily convinced. Ask Zelda for 5 bucks: she's such a pushover, she'll give it to you.
    1920s
  • put on the Ritz
    ( vp ) To do something in high style. I just got my bonus--tonight we're putting on the Ritz.
    1920s
  • queen
    ( n ) A male homosexual. He is a lovely old queen who would do anything for you.
    1920s
  • rag
    ( n ) Newspaper. We get very little international news in our local rag.
    1920s
  • razz
    ( v ) To tease, make fun of. The baseball fans started to razz the umpire.
    1920s
  • red hot
    ( ap ) Exciting. Your idea is really red hot.
    1920s
  • ritzy
    ( adj ) Luxurious. She expected to be taken to a ritzy uptown club, not to a dive in the Bronx.
    1920s
  • rube
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person from the country. I must have looked like some rube when I signed the contract to buy the Brooklyn Bridge.
    1920s
  • rubes
    ( n ) Money. I have to stay home tonight: no rubes.
    1920s
  • sap
    ( v ) To hit, to club. The police sapped all the strikers and chased them away.
    1920s
  • sap
    ( n ) A stupid person. Don't be a sap! If it looks too good to be true, it isn't.
    1920s
  • Says you!
    ( int ) An interjection of disbelief. It's going to rain tomorrow? Says you!
    1920s
  • scram
    ( v ) To leave. You're getting on my nerves, so. scram!
    1920s
  • scrooched
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. You came home totally scrooched last night; don't ever talk to me again.
    1920s
  • shack up
    ( v ) To sleep with someone at a hotel or motel. Claudia shacked up with her husband's business partner.
    1920s
  • Sheba
    ( n ) A sexy or seductive woman. She is just the Sheba I've been waiting for.
    1920s
  • sheik
    ( n ) A sexy man. Who is the sheik I saw her with last Friday?
    1920s
  • shiv
    ( n ) A knife. If you are popular, why do you think you have to keep a shiv in your pocket all the time?
    1920s
  • sinker
    ( n ) A doughnut. Hey, Joe! Give me a cup of joe and a couple of those week-old sinkers over there.
    1920s
  • slay
    ( phr ) Be very funny. What a story! You just slay me, Ferdie!
    1920s
  • slum
    ( v ) To go to a bad side of town. So what brings you to this side of town? Are you slumming?
    1920s
  • smoke
    ( v ) To kill. The mob didn't like him muscling in on their territory, so they smoked him.
    1920s
  • speakeasy
    ( n ) An illicit bar selling bootleg liquor. Ebenezer ran a speakeasy until the cops discovered it and broke it up.
    1920s
  • spifflicated
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. You're so spifflicated you can barely walk; you certainly can't drive.
    1920s
  • steady
    ( n ) Boyfriend or girlfriend. Natalie's steady is a hunk who works as a lifeguard at the beach.
    1920s
  • steam up
    ( v ) To make angry, mad. Don't get so steamed up over the issue.
    1920s
  • stick
    ( v ) Keep (contemptuous rejection). You can take your job and stick it.
    1920s
  • Stick 'em up!
    ( phr ) Raise your hands. Drop that gun and stick 'em up!
    1920s
  • struggle buggy
    ( np ) The backseat of a car. The struggle buggy is a parent's worst nightmare.
    1920s
  • stuck on
    ( adj ) To be in love with. I think Arnold is stuck on his secretary.
    1920s
  • swanky
    ( adj ) Luxurious. They spent the night in a swanky hotel with a ritzy restaurant on the top floor.
    1920s
  • sweetie
    ( n ) A term of affection for a female. Check out the sweetie by the bar.
    1920s
  • swell
    ( adj ) Excellent, outstanding. Thanks for helping out, Eula, you're really swell.
    1920s
  • take
    ( v ) To swindle or cheat. He was taken for all his money at the casino.
    1920s
  • take for a ride
    ( vp ) To drive someone away to kill. The capo ordered that the informer be taken for a ride.
    1920s
  • The bank is closed
    ( phr ) No kissing or hugging. I like you, Mac, but tonight the bank's closed.
    1920s
  • the berries
    ( n ) Something excellent, outstanding. You have to see the new exhibit at the art museum; it's the berries.
    1920s
  • the hair of the dog
    ( np ) A shot of an alcoholic drink to relieve a hangover. Wow, my head hurts! Give me a little hair of the dog that bit me and see if that helps.
    1920s
  • the real McCoy
    ( np ) Something genuine. That girl of his is not just good-looking; she's the real McCoy.
    1920s
  • torpedo
    ( n ) A hired killer. The torpedo she hired to off her husband turned out to be an undercover cop.
    1920s
  • twerp
    ( n ) Petty, immature brat. The little twerp told her mommie!
    1920s
  • twisted
    ( adj ) Perverted. I wouldn't go out with him; everyone says he is twisted.
    1920s
  • washed up
    ( adj ) Finished, done in. When the cops caught him, his criminal life was done in.
    1920s
  • wet blanket
    ( np ) A squelcher. Ralph is such a wet blanket, I doubt you can get him to go a party.
    1920s
  • wet rag
    ( np ) A squelcher. Arnold is such a wet rag he won't even dance.
    1920s
  • What's eating you?
    ( phr ) What is wrong with you? You don't want to see the Dodgers play? What's eating you?.
    1920s
  • Whoop-de-doo!
    ( int ) An Interjection of happy surprise. Our final has been cancelled? Whoopty-doo!
    1920s
  • whoopee
    ( n ) A good time. I've had a tough week. Let's go out and make some whoopee this weekend.
    1920s
  • whoopee
    ( n ) Hugging and kissing. They were in the living room making whoopee.
    1920s
  • whoopie!
    ( int ) An Interjection of happy surprise. Whoopie! Mama hit the jackpot!
    1920s
  • yahoo
    ( n ) A clumsy, unsophisticated person. Reba is going out with some yahoo from the sticks.
    1920s
  • zozzled
    ( adj ) Drunk, intoxicated. You're so zozzled you can't stand up.
    1920s
  • dumps
    ( n ) Depression, melancholy. His girl left him and now he is in the dumps.
    1920s
  • hot
    ( adj ) Electrically charged or radioactive. He accidentally picked up a hot wire and got a shock
    1920s
  • Jump in the lake!
    ( phr ) Don't bother me; you're crazy. You want me to loan you $5? Go jump in the lake!
    1920s
  • gravy train
    ( np ) A source of easy money. Boy, I wish I were a computer geek and could ride that gravy train.
    1920s
  • garden path, the
    ( np ) Misleading direction, deception. I'm afraid Grady has led you down the garden path, baby. You'll never get your money back.
    1920s
  • pooch
    ( n ) A dog. Hey, man! Where'd you get the cool pooch?
    1920s
  • conk
    ( v ) To hit. I think a brick must have fallen and conked Fuzzy on the noggin.
    1920s
  • hairy
    ( adj ) Crude, clumsy. Franklin made a hairy gesture and skiddooed.
    1920s
  • pick up
    ( v ) To try to get a stranger of the opposite sex to go home with you. Hey, let's go to the football game tonight and pick up a couple of girls.
    1920s
  • pick-up
    ( n ) You can always find pick-ups at a Hot 101 concert. You can always find pick-ups at a Hot 101 concert.
    1920s
  • hooey
    ( n ) Nonsense. All that stuff about inheriting a million dollars is just a lot of hooey.
    1920s
  • in hot water
    ( pp ) In trouble. As his wife had predicted months earlier, Bradley's gambling finally got him in hot water.
    1920s
  • hook
    ( n ) To get someone addicted to. I think Melvin is hooked on Gwendolyn; I saw her wearing his Yankees cap this morning.
    1920s
  • nerts
    ( adj ) Crazy, insane. You are completely nerts if you think I will go with you.
    1920s
  • bug-eyed
    ( adj ) Wide-eyed with astonishment. I've never seen anyone so bug-eyed as Turnips when I showed him the $100 bill.
    1920s
  • peg
    ( v ) Figure out, come to understand. I've got Randolph pegged: he's a dirty, rotten rat!
    1920s
  • lug
    ( n ) Coercion, pressure. He wouldn't pay until we put the lug on him.
    1920s
  • tearjerker
    ( n ) Sentimental story or movie. The TV series "Touched by an Angel" was a real tearjerker.
    1920s
  • booboisie
    ( n ) All boobs (knuckleheads) taken as a class. I'm never invited to Riley's parties: he only invites the cream of the local booboisie.
    1920s
  • potty
    ( adj ) Slightly crazy, insane. You must be potty to go out with that geek
    1920s
  • mojo
    ( n ) Voodoo magic power, personal power, inner strength. The president used his mojo to guarantee sunny weather for commencement.
    1920s
  • shot
    ( n ) A swallow or single portion. Hey, give me a shot of that stuff you're drinking.
    1920s
  • wheel
    ( n ) A leg. Letticia was convinced that her wheels were as good as anybody's.
    1920s
  • breeze
    ( n ) Something easy to do. Cutting your own hair is a breeze!
    1920s
  • G
    ( n ) A grand, $1000. Purvis left town owing me a "G."
    1920s
  • grease-monkey
    ( n ) (Offensive) An automobile mechanic. Do you want be a grease-monkey all your life
    1920s
  • dimwit
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. That dimwit thinks the Gettysburg Address is where Robert E. Lee lived.
    1920s
  • malarkey
    ( n ) Nonsense. All that malarkey about Paris Hilton and me isn't true.
    1920s

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