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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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54 Results for "leave"

  • ace
    ( n ) To leave. OK, dudes, let's ace or we're going to miss this thing.
    1990s
  • agitate the gravel
    ( vp ) To leave. OK, dude, let's agitate the gravel.
    1980s
  • bail
    ( v ) To leave. This party's a drag; let's bail.
    1990s
  • beat feet
    ( vp ) To leave. Let's beat feet out of here.
    2000s
  • beat it
    ( v ) To leave. When the cops drove up, we had to beat it.
    1910s
  • blow
    ( v ) To leave. I'm going to blow out of here now.
    1950s
  • boogie
    ( v ) To leave. The witching hour is coming up; let's boogie to it.
    1980s
  • book
    ( v ) To leave. I've got to get home; let's book.
    1990s
  • bounce
    ( v ) To force to leave. Malcolm got so boisterous in the bar they bounced him.
    1880s
  • bounce
    ( v ) To leave. This party is whack, man. Let's bounce.
    1980s
  • break
    ( v ) To leave. I have To leave. now; it's time to break (out of here).
    1950s
  • bug off
    ( v ) Leave, say good-bye. Why don't you just bug off!
    1970s
  • bug out
    ( v ) To leave. I've got exams tomorrow; time for me to bug out.
    1960s
  • bust
    ( v ) To leave. Yo, I'm bored; let's bust.
    1990s
  • bust out
    ( v ) To leave. Let's bust out of here and shoot some hoops.
    1950s
  • buzz off
    ( v ) Leave, say good-bye. Why don't you just buzz off and stop bothering me?
    1910s
  • check out
    ( v ) To leave. It's time for us to check out, Suzy; there's a funny smell in the air.
    1950s
  • clear off
    ( v ) To leave. Clear off and don't come back!
    1820s
  • clear out
    ( v ) To leave. I don't like it here; I'm going to clear out
    1850s
  • cut out
    ( v ) To leave. It is late; I have to cut out.
    1950s
  • ditch
    ( v ) To leave someone who is with you. I'll ditch my younger brother with my grandmother.
    1940s
  • fade
    ( v ) To leave. I have homework to do, man, let's fade.
    1930s
  • flake off
    ( v ) To leave. I told my brother to flake off because he was bothering me.
    1960s
  • flee the scene
    ( vp ) To leave. Come on, dudes; it's time to flee the scene.
    1960s
  • fly the coop
    ( vp ) To leave, elope, or escape. When he saw you coming up the walk, he flew the coop.
    1930s
  • get lost
    ( int ) To leave, go away. Stop bothering me! Get lost!
    1940s
  • hit the road
    ( vp ) To leave. Man, it's 11 o'clock; time for us to hit the road.
    1920s
  • jam
    ( v ) To leave. The music's getting too loud; I'm jamming.
    1980s
  • jet
    ( v ) To leave. I have homework to do; let's jet.
    1990s
  • kick it
    ( v ) To leave. Well, I have to write a paper tonight so I better be kicking it.
    1990s
  • kiss off
    ( vp ) Leave, dismiss, kill. Why don't you just kiss off if you don't want to work.
    1930s
  • leave holding the bag
    ( vp ) To be made a scapegoat. When the hand grenade exploded beneath the cow, Beulah was left holding the bag.
    1860s
  • light out
    ( v ) Move quickly, leave suddenly. When Mel heard Lance was there, he lit out for Megan's place.
    1860s
  • make it
    ( v ) To leave. When are you going to make it?
    1990s
  • make tracks
    ( vp ) To leave. When are you going to make tracks?
    1950s
  • navigate
    ( v ) To leave. It's late; lets navigate.
    1990s
  • pearl
    ( v ) To leave. I'll catch you later. I'm about to pearl.
    1990s
  • push off
    ( v ) To leave. I am going to push off now.
    1950s
  • roll
    ( v ) To leave. Eleven o'clock? It's time to roll!
    1950s
  • roll out
    ( v ) To leave. It's getting late; we are about to roll out.
    1980s
  • scoot
    ( v ) To leave, go. Wow! Is it that late? I have to scoot.
    1750s
  • scram
    ( v ) To leave. You're getting on my nerves, so. scram!
    1920s
  • shag ass
    ( v ) To leave. This library sucks; let's shag ass.
    1950s
  • skeedaddle
    ( v ) Leave, go way quickly. I'd better skeedaddle, if I want to make it to work on time.
    1860s
  • skiddoo
    ( v ) To leave. Come on, kiddo, time for us to skiddoo.
    1900s
  • skidoo
    ( v ) To leave. Come on, kiddo, time for us to skidoo.
    1900s
  • skip
    ( v ) To leave with someone in pursuit. She took the money and skipped town.
    1940s
  • split
    ( v ) To leave. It is time to split and go see the movie.
    1950s
  • stiff
    ( v ) To leave the bill for someone else to pay. He invited me out then stiffed me with the bill.
    1950s
  • take a hike
    ( v ) To leave. I am tired of all your complaining. Take a hike!
    1930s
  • take a powder
    ( v ) To leave. Look, if you don't like it here, take a powder.
    1940s
  • tip
    ( v ) To leave. Let's tip; this party's a drag.
    1990s
  • to be out of here
    ( vp ) To leave. Well, I have to write a paper tonight; I'm out of here.
    1970s
  • vamoose
    ( v ) To leave. Come on, partners. Let's vamoose.
    1830s

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