Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

Viridescent

Use this forum to discuss past Good Words.

Viridescent

Postby Dr. Goodword » Fri Jun 07, 2013 10:40 pm

• viridescent •


Pronunciation: vi-rê-des-ênt • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Adjective

Meaning: Beginning to turn green, greenish.

Notes: This word comes with a shorter fraternal twin, virescent, which we may use when we need the sense of today's Good Word, but are in a hurry. We know they come from the same family, because they share the same lexical root, vir-. Of course, we always form the noun from adjectives on -ent or -ant by simply adding an [s] sound, and spelling the nouns viridescence and virescence.

In Play: You know how beautiful trees are early in the spring when they are just beginning to unfurl their leaves, which have not yet turned fully green? This is the word to describe them: "The crocuses, hyacinths and daffodils were resplendent in full colors beneath the majestic arches of viridescent elms." Although some have used this word in the sense of "greenish", the actual meaning is "becoming green". So try it like this, too: "Maude, how do you feel? You look a bit viridescent, as though you were about to throw up."

Word History: Today's Good Word came from Late Latin viridescen(t)s "greening", the present participle of viridescere "to become green". A shorter form of this word is virescere "to become green", whose participle gave us the shorter adjective virescent with the same meaning as today's Good Word. This is the 'verbed' form of Latin viridis "green", which French turned into verd-, then vert "green". We find the root verd- in verdant "green with plant life" and verdure "greenery", both of which we borrowed from French. (We thank Mary Jane Stoneburg, one of the editors of the Good Word series, for dreaming of spring's viridescence and suggesting we add today's bit of springiness to our series.)
• The Good Dr. Goodword
User avatar
Dr. Goodword
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3509
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 9:28 am
Location: Lewisburg, PA

Re: Viridescent

Postby Perry Lassiter » Fri Jun 07, 2013 11:49 pm

How do we distinguish between vir- as green and vir- as man, as in virile. And does virtue fit in here anywhere?
pl
Perry Lassiter
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2337
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:41 pm
Location: RUSTON, LA

Re: Viridescent

Postby Philip Hudson » Sat Jun 08, 2013 1:38 am

Virtue and virlie both stem from Latin man. There is no getting around sexist language. Is vir- used for green in English? Give me an example. Verde means green in Spanish. I am familiar with thallium for green as a Greek root. The element thallium has a green radiation spectra. A thallium stress test for the heart may be performed after an injection of thallium. The heart may be viewed in real time and in great detail on a monitor from a thallium sensor. I have had such a test. Just like the PET scan of my brain, they found nothing.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
Philip Hudson
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1732
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:41 am
Location: Texas

Re: Viridescent

Postby Philip Hudson » Sat Jun 08, 2013 2:14 am

Sometimes my mind compartmentalizes itself. How else can I explain a request for an example of vir- for green in a Good Word discussion that is about viridescent? My apologies to all who have to put up with me.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
Philip Hudson
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1732
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:41 am
Location: Texas

Re: Viridescent

Postby Slava » Sat Jun 08, 2013 9:02 am

Perry Lassiter wrote:How do we distinguish between vir- as green and vir- as man, as in virile.
By using the longer form. Virid means green or verdant. Dropping the -id leads to the confusion.
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4627
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Re: Viridescent

Postby gailr » Sun Jun 09, 2013 3:11 pm

Two more greens: verdigris and viridian, both chemical reactions with copper, with variations in color and light-fastness.
User avatar
gailr
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1945
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2005 11:40 am

Re: Viridescent

Postby Slava » Fri Jun 14, 2013 11:41 pm

Just for curiosity's sake, another word for verdigris is aerugo.

As to viridescent plants and such, did you know that on certain shrubberies the stuff I call "new green" is edible? Pluck it off and chow down. Perhaps a bit late in the season now, but think about it for next Spring.
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4627
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Re: Viridescent

Postby Philip Hudson » Sat Jun 15, 2013 2:55 am

Cacti are viridescent plants. The young leaves of the prickly pear ( a cactus not a pear at all) are eaten by some Texans. At the stage before thorns form, the leaves are cut from the plant. For breakfast they are sliced thinly and fried to go with eggs and sausage. They are also cooked in sugar water until they are saturated with sugar. These are eaten as a candy. The fruit of the prickley pear is a cylindrical fruit called a tuna. It is about 3 cm long and 2 cm in diametrer. There are thorns on these fruits when they turn a deep purple color and are ripe. The tunas are carefully cut from the plant and singed over an open flame to burn off the thorns. Then they are cooked into filling for a pie or as jam. There are many more native Texas plants that can be used for food. Many Texas Amerinds were expert at using the available plants for food.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
Philip Hudson
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1732
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:41 am
Location: Texas


Return to Good Word Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests