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Punks and Hippies

Historical Dictionary of American Slang

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31 Results in A (You are getting Full results. Get Clean Results for "A")

  • ace
    ( adj ) Expert. He's an ace reporter.
    1940s
  • ace
    ( n ) To leave. OK, dudes, let's ace or we're going to miss this thing.
    1990s
  • ace
    ( n ) One dollar bill. Let's eat out tonight; I have a couple of aces burning a hole in my pocket.
    1920s
  • ace
    ( v ) To make an 'A'. She aced the quantum physics test.
    1960s
  • action
    ( n ) Excitement. Do you know where the action is in this town?
    1960s
  • actor
    ( n ) Show-off. He's got nothing going for him; he's just an actor.
    1990s
  • agitate the gravel
    ( vp ) To leave. OK, dude, let's agitate the gravel.
    1980s
  • airhead
    ( n ) A stupid or foolish person. My sister's boyfriend is a real airhead who doesn't know Tom Cruise from cruise control.
    1980s
  • all about
    ( ap ) To be very focused on, fixed on. I'm all about that gorgeous guy over there.
    1980s
  • all nerves
    ( np ) Tense, nervous. By the time I got my convertible out of the car wash, I was all nerves.
    1930s
  • all over
    ( ap ) To be very focused on, fixed on. The bio project? I'm all over it!
    1970s
  • all show and no go
    ( np ) Flashy but can't do anything. He thinks he's the chief but he's all show and no go.
    1970s
  • all wet
    ( ap ) Wrong. You're all wet. The New York Giants didn't win the 1937 World Series.
    1920s
  • all-nighter
    ( n ) A restaurant that stays open all night. It was 3 AM but they found a little all-nighter on the corner where they could get a cup of java.
    1930s
  • all-nighter
    ( n ) An all-night studying binge. I almost fell asleep during the test after pulling an all-nighter.
    1960s
  • also-ran
    ( n ) A horse that loses races or an unsuccessful human competitor. Dealer's Choice is another also-ran that never won a race.
    1890s
  • amp down
    ( v ) To calm down. Girl, you need to amp down.
    1990s
  • And how!
    ( int ) An interjection of strong agreement. Did I have a good time? And how!.
    1920s
  • ankle-biter
    ( n ) A child. Yes, Sam got married, settled down, and now has a playroom full of ankle-biters.
    1850s
  • antifreeze
    ( n ) Liquor or other alcoholic beverage. I really need some antifreeze in me on cold days like this.
    1960s
  • ape
    ( v ) To imitate. Gerty apes everything her sister does.
    1630s
  • Applesauce!
    ( int ) Nonsense! Applesauce! The New York Yankees won the 1937 World Series.
    1920s
  • armpit
    ( n ) An undesirable place. This town is really an armpit.
    1950s
  • around the block
    ( pp ) Mature, experienced. Mavis has been around the block a few times too many!
    1960s
  • at sea
    ( pp ) Confused. I think Margaret is at sea on the math homework.
    1810s
  • attaboy
    ( int ) Well done! Attaboy, Greg. You show them!
    1920s
  • attagirl
    ( int ) Well done! Attagirl, Gwen. You show them!
    1920s
  • awesome
    ( adj ) Great. What an awesome sunset.
    1980s
  • ax
    ( n ) Dismissal from work. The fourth time they caught her sleeping on the job, Constance Noring was given the ax.
    1920s
  • ax
    ( v ) To fire. He just got axed from his third job this week.
    1920s
  • axe
    ( n ) A musical instrument. My axe is guitar; what's yours?
    1960s

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